Opening Reception – solo exhibition “Transience”

Wilder Gallery, Lamorinda Arts Council, Orinda, CA, 94563, April 2-30, 2022
Reception: April 3, Sunday, 2:30-4:30 pm
Direction: Map directions to The Art Gallery at Wilder. (bit.ly/map-wilder)
Gallery Hours: M-F 10am-4pm. Additional viewings can be arranged by appointment with curators Denise Nomura and Aniston Breslin. Contact them at wildergallery@lamorindaarts.org.

These works were painted in the last two years, during the pandemic. With rich and dark colors and somewhat unsettling subject matter, they capture a sense of disquiet, isolation, and uncertainty – feelings we have all experienced in recent times, and hope to overcome soon.

Full Transience exhibition archive

Opening Reception of “Enigma” – Solo Exhibition at Gallerie Valerie

Enigma – a solo Exhibition
Gallerie Valerie, presents Matthew Felix Sun, September 3 – 26, 2021.
628 2nd Ave, Suite 203, Crockett, CA 94525

Opening reception September 3rd, from 7 to 9 pm.

The pieces presented by Gallerie Valarie are chiefly representational, even realistic, yet they often cloak twists or hidden meanings. Beneath their surfaces are darker truths, or riddles that invite further investigation. Paintings such as Anselm Kiefer’s Bathtubs, Arabesque, Leisurely, or The March of Time are imbued with enigma.

Full exhibition archive

Artists Choice 2022 Juried Exhibition Reception

My oil painting “Leisurely” has been selected as part of the Artists Choice 2022 juried exhibition (Sep. 27 – Nov. 4) at San Francisco Women Artists Gallery (SFWA).

Juror: Ashley L. Voss, Owner & Director, Voss Gallery.

RECEPTION: Saturday, October 1st, 2:00 – 4:00

647 Irving St. at 8th Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122
Tue. – Sat. 10:30am to 5:30pm | 415.566.8550

A Very Cool Landscape Painting – Crisp

Though lately I am mostly attracted to shifting patterns, colors, tones, and shapes, from time to time, I am still inspired by pure scenery, particularly when I can discern such variations, and especially if the landscape evokes strong emotions such as moody melancholy. Such an image I had encountered in Manchurian China, barely a few months before the pandemic started to ravage the globe, intrigued and challenged me to create an oil painting when sheltered at home, Crisp, an understated work aptly captured a sense of community, isolation, and resilience.

Crisp - 清冷 - Knackig
Crisp
22” x 28”
Oil on Canvas
Completed in 2020

This painting is being exhibited in Biafarin Online Exhibition (March 10 – April 10, 2021): Exhibizone – Winter 2021 Catalog.

Featured Painting: Time Frame

Identifying myself primarily a representational artist, does not exclude me from time to time being drawn to purely abstract visions, which excite with contrasting or even clashing colors, interplay of of shades, lines, and intricacies of patterns and forms. One of my successful results is a recent gouache painting, Time Frame, which intrigues viewers with ever expanding viewfinders, appealingly complementing secondary colors, and an array of ever shifting lines of different lengths, angles, and hues.

Time Frame / 時間框架 / Zeitrahmen
Time Frame
Gouache on Paper
7” x 11”
Completed in 2018

This painting will be exhibited at Berkeley Expression Gallery, September – December 2018, as part of the “Autumn Colors” group exhibition.

Featured Painting – Our Winter of Discontent

Immediately after the devastating 2016 US presidential election, I was in the grip of a stark vision, in which innocent and powerless people were rounded up by an oppressive strongman regime. That was the inception of my new project, “Our Winter of Discontent”, to evoke an assembly of miserable, discontent, and angry people, behind a sprawling web of barbed wire and menaced by dark clouds from above. This vision was not paranoid fiction; it was based on observation of Donald Trump’s increasingly divisive and hateful rhetoric, which led to his capture of the presidency, and reaffirmed the ugly political and cultural reality of an almost apocalyptic US.

The world at large had been threatened in recent years by rising totalitarian and nationalistic trends, and the diminishing of liberal democracy. The situation worsened every day as I painted, under the weight of Trump’s daily assault on democracy, free press, the rule of law, etc. My warning vision became a sad prophecy, as many asylum seekers and their young children were brutally separated, and summarily detained. It seemed — and seems now — that things could only get worse, that those behind the barbed wire fences could well include U.S. citizens and legal immigrants, not only those deemed “illegal.”

A good vision doesn’t necessarily lead to good painting. After many months’ struggle, I put aside my first attempt, which had become somewhat too belabored, and a bit unyielding, and started over with version two. Yet, though satisfying to a certain degree, it became a bit regimented, less spontaneous, and also a bit removed from my vision of a manic world of disorder.

Having learned my lessons from those two attempts, I started a third version, and it achieved what I set out to document, with an unsettling and fluid visual style that matches our disturbing and depressing zeitgeist.

Here, the final product, “Our Winter of Discontent”.

The painting was completed before the world was assaulted by the novel Coronavirus, and most brutally affected in countries whose leaders are waging wars against science, and suppressing free press and truth. The painting was created before the tsunami of “Black Lives Matter” protests took hold in the US. But it evokes, or perhaps portends, the suffering and struggle that rolls on ceaselessly through human history.

These are the emotions and historical trends, my painting “Our Winter of Discontent” is trying to capture and reflect.

Our Winter of Discontent / 我們不滿的冬天 / Unser Winter der Unzufriedenheit

Our Winter of Discontent
Oil on Canvas
22” x 28”
Completed in 2018

Featured Painting – Congregation

A giant verdant tree, erect on its strong and knobbly roots, full of colorful chairs hanging from its riotously wide-spreading branches, is quite a heartwarming congregation. Warm and deep colors intertwined with shades cool and pale, helps to create modulating and shifting moods.

Despite joyous colors of those chairs, their positions are somewhat precarious, manifested in a lone chair underneath the seemingly carefree gathering, clinging to the roots of the tree — knocked down, a fallen one, or a cast out one? It would be up to viewers to interpret.

Apropos viewer’s perception, I was also somewhat surprised to hear from a friend on how disturbing the painting was. Those swinging chairs, somewhat called more disturbing images to his mind — hanging bodies swinging in high branches, echoing those from war times documented by Goya, or from not so distant periods of concentrated lynching, whose records were fading fast from our collective memory. This linkage to the darkness was so serendipitous, that even I needed such illumination. Apparently, my intention, combining with viewers’ interpretation, could have generated much more interesting dialogue, thus create another form of congregation.

Congregation / 聚會 / Gemeinde

This painting currently is being exhibited at Berkeley Central Arts Passage, as part of the Unity show (June 16th – October 13th, 2018)